The Barossa Valley Wine Region of South Australia

- 10/8/2012 6:48:14 PM
Wine has long been an important part of Australia's economy and culture. Ever since the first British settlers landed on the new continent, winemaking has flourished in Australia's unique geography and climate. The country stayed relatively safe from the phyllexora outbreak, and besides pesky kangaroos and avian nuisances, grapevines in Australia have little to worry about. There are wine regions in every Australian state, some of which are more famous than others. Australia is known for both its mass-market wine such as the popular Yellow Tail as well as award winning vintages from fine wine producers.
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A Few of the Wine Regions in Portugal

- 10/7/2012 6:48:14 PM
Wine coming from Portugal is very popular all over the world, first brought to the country by the Romans, but also by the Greeks, Carthaginians, Greeks, and Phoenicians. The modern day export market got its start in 1703 when Portugal shipped wines up to England. In 1758, Portugal was home to the very first classified wine region in the world, known as Regiao Demarcada do Douro. Two modern wine regions, Douro Valley and Pico Island, are World Heritage sites. Portugal is currently home to 26 wine regions, some of which have their own sub-regions. They are called DOC’s, an acronym which proclaims the regions as protected designations of origin for wines and other agricultural products in Portugal. 
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All About Cabernet Sauvignon

- 10/6/2012 6:48:14 PM
You don't need to be a wine connoisseur to have heard of Cabernet Sauvignon. It is one of the world's most popular red grape varieties and is grown in almost every wine producing country on the planet. Cabernet Sauvignon first became internationally popular when it was commonly blended with Merlot and Cabernet Franc to create a number of different Bordeaux wines. It grew to become the world's most widely planted red grape variety for most of the 20th century, only being passed by Merlot in the 1990's. Cabernet Sauvignon first became internationally popular when it was commonly blended with Merlot and Cabernet Franc to create a number of different Bordeaux wines
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The Wine Region of Castile and Leon

- 10/5/2012 6:48:14 PM
Castile and Leon is an autonomous community located in northwest Spain. It is the largest such community in the entire European Union and covers an area of 94,223 square kilometers. Around twenty five million Spaniards call Castile and Leon home (as of 2011). The region is of considerable historical value, and it is claimed that 60% of the country's artistic and cultural heritage stems from Castile and Leon. 8 properties are part of the World Heritage, and there are 112 historical sites, 400 museums, 300 castles, 11 cathedrals, and the biggest concentration of Romanic art on the planet. Castile and Leon is also a truly integral part of the world's wine culture. Many Spanish DO's are based in Castile and Leon, and each of them provides a rich and unique wine that is based on one of the many local grapes. Most of the wine coming out of Castile and Leon is red, although one winery in particular offers a delicious white wine that is enjoyed worldwide
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The Wine Region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia

- 10/4/2012 6:48:14 PM
Friuli-Venezia Giulia is one of 20 total Italian wine regions that correspond with the 20 regions of Italy. About 1.2 million people live in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, and the area is a travelled heavily due to its position connecting the east and west of southern Europe. Friuli-Venezia Giulia has a rich history, especially around the capital of Trieste
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The Wine Region of Castile-La Mancha

- 10/3/2012 6:48:14 PM
Covering 79,463 square kilometers, Castile-La Mancha is the third largest autonomous community in Spain. Known to the Spanish as Castilla-La Mancha, it was made famous by the classic Spanish novel Don Quixote, and remains famous due to its wine. Two thirds of Spain’s vineyards are in Castile-La Mancha, and the community boasts 600 wineries in 9 DO’s. Most of the community is windswept and dry, and even though Castile-La Mancha is the third largest autonomous community in Spain it’s also the least densely populated. The population density is only 26 people per square kilometer, and the autonomous community only counts for 4% of Spain’s population. 
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